Choosing Courage Over Clarity

How to Start Moving Forward Without Knowing Everything

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While preparing for my last trip to East Africa, I reached out for advice from a man who cares for orphaned children living with AIDS in Uganda. Taking advantage of the time that he was living in San Diego while pursuing a Ph.D., we met up to discuss the water project that I was embarking upon in Kenya. After talking through a variety of approaches to the project, I will never forget the advice that he left me with. “Just do something.”

I’ve spent much of the past several years trying to figure out why it takes me so long to get anything done. The objectives that matter most to me always seem to be stuck in a holding pattern. I’m starting to realize that these indefinite holds have much to do with misunderstanding the relationship between clarity and courage.

Taking the Time to Remember

Productivity, Reflections

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Someone once told me that the older you get the faster time goes by. Every passing year seems to make this statement truer than ever. We often try to figure out how long ago something occurred and realizing that it was longer ago than we thought, we say, “Wow! Time flies, huh?”

The speed of time can often make us feel that our lives are out of our own control. Life doesn’t seem to slow down long enough to let us exert intention and control over how we spend our time. This makes the future come so quick that we don’t formulate a plan in time to handle it. It also makes the past seem so distant that we fail to reflect upon what has happened to us. Both planning and reflecting require intentional effort.

Coffee & Tea Collective

Coffee, Culture

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A few months back we discovered the Coffee & Tea Collective in North Park and it instantly became my favorite coffee shop in San Diego. As I walked through the door it reminded me of the artisan coffee houses in the Pacific Northwest and made me wonder how it had taken me so long to find it.

The Coffee & Tea Collective is where I fell in love with the pour-over. Although I usually take cream and a little bit of sugar with my coffee, these pour-overs have such a clean taste that they don’t need any help. The minimalist atmosphere has become my favorite place to reflect, plan and write.

The Coffee & Tea Collective was recently ranked by Eater.com as one of “The 21 Hottest Coffee Shops Across the US” and for good reason. Here’s a collection of photos to celebrate a pleasant environment and some of San Diego’s finest coffee.

1000 Cups Coffee House

Travel

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There are a few moments in life where you make profound discoveries that change your life forever. Although long in the making, these defining moments are what we remember when looking back. One of moments occurred to me six years ago at the 1000 Cups Coffee House in Kampala, Uganda. This discovery for me was not of deep spiritual importance but it did help to refine what became one of my most enduring interests, enjoying a good cup of coffee.

Attracted by a flyer offering a coffee safari, I figured that a place that could introduce you to the coffee process probably makes some pretty good coffee. My boda boda driver (motorcycle taxi) struggled to find the place from my vague description. Stepping through the door I liked the place instantly. It looked like what an artisan coffee shop in Africa should look like, complete with a rustic wooden setting and well arranged sacks of fresh roasted coffee beans.

Vintage Safari

Photography, Travel

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On the way to my most recent trip to East Africa I found an article on safari in an issue of Conde Nast Traveler. The classic look of the images that they displayed inspired me to capture my own series of vintage safari pictures. Using our tented camp just outside of Maassai Mara National Reserve in Kenya, my sister and I captured a collection I have entitled Vintage Safari. Click here to see the rest of the images from this collection.

Traveling With My Sister

Causes, Travel

Rebekah and I on safari at Kenya's Maassai Mara.

Rebekah and I on safari at Kenya’s Maassai Mara.


One of the great joys of my life has been sharing my love of travel with my younger sister, Rebekah. Our shared adventures include a three week road trip through the American West visiting 13 states and 7 national parks. We once drove from Ohio to Homer, Alaska, spending a spontaneous summer together in the Last Frontier. We’ve traveled along Lake Superior’s scenic North Shore and camped at Southern California’s San Onofre State Beach. We learned to surf together in the Pacific Ocean and kayaked for the first time during one of our journeys to Colorado.

When I told her that I was heading back to East Africa she decided that she wanted to join me this time. I welcomed the idea of taking our initial trip together overseas, especially since this was our first chance to travel since she has given birth to two beautiful little boys.

The Story Behind the Yadumu Project

Causes

Yadumu Team
We were young, energetic and ready to change the world. Combining our love for photography, video, travel and serving causes that matter we set out to find worthy projects in East Africa needing support. We aimed to tell their stories through well-designed visual communications. As aspiring creative professionals we wanted to use our skills for projects that would make a difference in the world.

This upcoming series of posts transitions from my time in South Sudan into discussing our ongoing projects elsewhere in East Africa. Sharing the background story here will reveal the context behind these projects. “Yadumu” is the Swahili word for “long life” identifying with our desire to support life-saving causes in East Africa.

The Nile is Not Just a River in Egypt

Causes, Travel

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On a bright Sunday afternoon in Nimule, South Sudan, a group decided to set out on a walking trip to the Nile River. Following Elizabeth, a volunteer at the Cornerstone Children’s Home from Colorado, visitors and children alike set made this trek. The next few hours yielded rich cultural and natural experiences.

I walked alongside Jimmy, a sixteen year old orphan who speaks great English and always carries a sheepish grin on his face as though he is planning some kind of mischief. Jimmy is a fun to joke around with and behind his jovial manner is a kind heart. Enjoying this opportunity to get to know him, we spent most of the way there and back in conversation.

Playing a Game Called Dababa

Causes, Travel

You can learn much about a society by watching children play. The games and activities that they embrace can be instructive about the society in which they are raised. The children at Cornerstone Children’s Home in South Sudan played a that game that seemed impossible for us visitors to figure out. Aside from football (what we call soccer) it seemed to be their favorite game to play.

After trying in vain to figure out how the game worked I decided one evening to join in. Ohwilo, one of the boys from the children’s home, saw that I didn’t know what I was doing and grabbed my hand to try to walk me through it.

I Want to See the Photos

Causes, Travel


Children everywhere love to see photos. On my first day in Southern Sudan I met a little girl named Dorothy at the Cornerstone Children’s Home. Most of those who know her call her by her nickname, Nyonyo. I was carrying my camera at the time so she pleaded, “I want to see the photos.”

After showing her some of the pictures she approached me later on asking to see the photos on my phone. Every time I saw her for the first couple days I was there she repeated in the same begging voice, “I want to see the photos.”

One evening I saw her and jokingly said the same thing to her using her tone of voice. She promptly disappeared and then returned with a small photo album. I sat down on the concrete with her as she told me about the people in her photos.